Cancer Prevention

Popular weed killer deemed probable carcinogen by UN

LONDON — One of the world’s most popular weedkillers – and the most widely used kind in the U.S. – has been labeled a probable carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer.

The decision was made by IARC, the France-based cancer research arm of the World Health Organization, which considered the status of five insect and weed killers including glyphosate, which is used globally in industrial farming.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, which makes its own determinations, said it would consider the French agency’s evaluation.

From Climbing Mountains to Cleaning Couches: The Woman Eliminating Toxic Chemicals From Our Lives

Some challenges are worth taking on more than once. That's what Arlene Blum decided after realizing her work to reduce toxic chemicals in the home was in jeopardy.

Arlene Blum took 20 years to write her memoir, Breaking Trail: A Climbing Life. This isn’t surprising, considering her life has taken shape as a constant and gradual learning process, with very few resting moments.

Fatal If Swallowed

Dogs and cleaning products don’t mix!

There are plenty of cleaning products out there that are harmful to humans, but our dogs are much more sensitive to them.


Well, our fury companions spend much of their days on our floors, carpets, and head deep in our toilet bowls.

All places we clean – all places they like to lick and lay in!

Food coloring in soft drinks carries cancer risk, new study shows

The caramel coloring used in many soda products produces a carcinogen that could raise the risk of cancer in consumers

The latest results of a study comparing the attributes of 11 different soft drinks, as well as analyzing the consumption habits of Americans, have shown that drinking as little as one soda a day could be enough to expose consumers to potentially cancer-causing levels of the chemical 4-methylimidazole, or 4-MEI for short.

Looking for that fruit or vegetable that might prevent cancer?

Blueberries. Green tea. Tomatoes. And, oh, that cruciferous cauliflower. All make the lists of super foods that might help prevent cancer. Then there are the foods such as smoked meat and fried foods that supposedly might cause cancer. Such information is standard fare for TV doctors and Web sites, but most of us don’t know how to judge such claims.

What sounds authoritative may not be. Only about half of the recommendations on two internationally syndicated TV medical talk shows were supported by scientific evidence, according to a recent study in the journal BMJ.

Smoking May Be More Dangerous Than Previously Thought, Study Says

Kidney disease and fatal infections now linked to the nasty habit

Smoking may contribute to the deaths of an additional 60,00-120,000 Americans per year says a new study published by The New England Journal of Medicine.

From the years 2000 to 2011 researchers followed nearly a million people, including 89,000 current smokers, and concluded that smoking increased the risk of deaths from diseases not previously associated with the habit, according to the New York Times.

Only A Small Fraction Of Cancers Are Unpreventable

A significant number of Americans believe they have no power in preventing cancer, even though factors that remain out of their control — like genetics and family history — account for less than 20 percent of all cancers.

Cancer prevention: 7 tips to reduce your risk

Concerned about cancer prevention? Take charge by making changes such as eating a healthy diet and getting regular screenings.

You've probably heard conflicting reports about cancer prevention. Sometimes the specific cancer-prevention tip recommended in one study or news report is advised against in another.

In many cases, what is known about cancer prevention is still evolving. However, it's well accepted that your chances of developing cancer are affected by the lifestyle choices you make.

The Scary Truth about BPA-Free Plastics

When we first heard about the dangers of bisphenol A (BPA), a compound used to make hard plastics for things like reusable water bottles and food containers, we were horrified: A chemical leaking into our food and drinks that can disrupt our hormone levels and possibly lead to weight gain, fertility issues, and cancer? We’ll pass. (Some states, like CA, even tried to implement Labels Warning of BPA in Foods.)

Heart risk in bottles and women most vulnerable

EXPOSURE to a chemical found in plastic bottles and drink cans could be bad for the heart, a new study has claimed.

Researchers exposed mice from birth to bisphenol A (BPA) and found heart function and blood pressure are affected differently in males and females, with females at greater risk of damage from stress.

BPA is widely used as a lining for cans and plastic bottles.