Cancer Prevention

7 Ways to Lower Your Risk of Breast Cancer

Every health organization that is working to fight a disease talks about “raising awareness.” But in the case of breast cancer, there are few people who aren’t already “aware.” It’s the most common cancer in women. With diagnosed cases on the rise and one in eight women likely to develop breast cancer in her lifetime, virtually everyone knows someone who has had it. And it often seems like it strikes at random, caused by unfathomable outside forces.
One in eight women are likely to develop breast cancer in her lifetime.

12 Non-Toxic Ways to Use Baking Soda

Stop! Don’t run out to the store and get that bottle or jar of a chemical-laden product for that household chore. There’s a good chance the box of baking soda you’ve already got can do the job. It’s a versatile deodorizer and cleaning product that comes in handy for so many situations around the house. And that means you don’t have to have a whole shelf full of (potentially toxic) products for different jobs. If you’re curious about the science behind baking soda, check out the video from the American Chemical Society for a simple explanation of how and why it works.

How Toxins Are Changing Childhood

The number of (largely untested) chemicals in our environment is on the rise, as are the rates of autism, cancer, and other serious health problems affecting kids. KIWI investigates
 this “silent pandemic”—and reveals how parents can fight back.

How Girls Are Developing Earlier In An Age Of 'New Puberty'

Many girls are beginning puberty at an early age, developing breasts sooner than girls of previous generations. But the physical changes don't mean the modern girls' emotional and intellectual development is keeping pace.

Two doctors have written a book called The New Puberty that looks at the percentage of girls who are going through early puberty, the environmental, biological and socioeconomic factors that influence when puberty begins, and whether early puberty is linked with an increased risk of breast cancer.

Concern grows in firefighters, others after cancer-causing flame retardants found in test subjects

A growing body of evidence found an array of flame-retardant chemicals – many which are carcinogenic – in test participants, a potential health concern for firefighters and others exposed to the chemicals.

The most recent study on flame-retardant chemicals, released in October, found the flame-retardant chemical chlorinated Tris in the blood and urine of all but one of the 16 nonsmoking adults tested in the study.

Is Rubber Mulch a Safe Surface for Your Child's Playground?

The public playground in Bandon, a small town on the blustery coast of Oregon, has everything a kid could want. Swings and an orange, twisting slide, even a bright blue boat.

But after the playground was installed in 2009, some mothers became concerned about the springy black stuff beneath their children's feet. In addition to the new equipment, the playground was outfitted with the latest in safety surfacing: a pool of shredded rubber from old tires, also known as "rubber mulch," which can cushion kids' falls better than gravel or wood chips.

Soap power: Handwash chemical linked to cancer

Washing your hands with antibacterial soap may be dangerous, a new US study reveals. A chemical found in many liquid handwashes and other basic household products like shampoos and toothpaste has been linked to cancer.

The Bad Air in Our Gyms

With chilly weather settling in and darkness arriving before most people’s workdays end, many of us are shifting our workouts indoors, a practice that is much better for us than abandoning exercise for the winter. But a new study of air quality in gyms raises some interesting questions about whether the places in which we work out are as healthy as they should be.

Tips for a non-toxic home

Most often when people think of living healthier lives, they focus on food and exercise. That’s a smart idea, as what we eat and drink, and how we keep ourselves fit, play important roles in overall wellness. But what we breathe, rub against and come in contact with in our homes can also have a significant effect on how we feel.

Some Personal Care Products May Build Up In Pools

Water Quality: Standard chlorination steps do not break down some compounds that wash off swimmers

When swimmers skip the showers before diving into the pool, they may transfer personal care products into the water, some of which can persist and accumulate. A new study reports that pool chlorination does not break down some of these chemicals, allowing them to build up in concentration (Environ. Sci. Technol. Lett. 2014, DOI: 10.1021/ez5003133).